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Western Schley

Western Schley pecan trees produce small, high-quality nuts. The Western Schley cultivar is the most common variety of pecan that is planted in the Southwest. (Average in shell count: 70-90; Kernel Yield: 55-60%; Thinner shells, higher meat yield, larger size)

Wichita



Wichita cultivars produce medium sized nuts. Wichita nuts tend to have a higher percent kernel and a good fill. (Average in shell count: 60/lb; Kernel Yield: 58-60%; Thinner shells, higher meat yield, larger size)

Stuart Blend



The Stuart tree matures early in the season. Stuart trees typically produce large nuts and can be very productive cultivars. (Average in shell count: 55-63/lb, Kernel Yield: 45-49%)

 
 
 
 
Desirable

The Desirable pecan tree tends to produce large, well-filled nuts that result in excellent kernels and a large amount of mammoth halves. This makes the Desirable cultivar a great sheller. (Average Count: 47-54/lb; Kernel Yield: 50-53%; Larger in size)

Pawnee


Pawnee trees are known for their nut size and early nut maturity. Pawnees produce high-quality, medium to large size nuts with light colored kernels. As a mature tree, Pawnee is one of the top kernel producers. (Average In shell count: 55/lb; Kernel Yield: 56-60%; Thin shell, large, and sweet)

Moneymaker

The Moneymaker variety of pecan tends to have a thick shell with a round nut. When compared to other pecan varieties, Moneymakers typically have a darker kernel. Due to its early maturity, Moneymakers adapt well to the holiday market. (Average in shell count: 63-72/lb; Kernel yield: 43-46%)

Cape Fear


As a young tree, Cape Fear is known for producing well-filled nuts and golden kernels. However, when the tree has matured, the percent kernel found in Cape Fear tends to be on the decline. (Average in shell count: 51-57/lb; Kernel Yield: 50-54%)

Sumner


Sumner pecan cultivars produce moderate quality, large nuts. Sumner pecan trees are slow to come into bearing, and typically have a late harvest date. (Average in shell count: 50-56/lb; Kernel Yield: 51-54%)

Packing: 50 lb. bags (22.68 kg): 880-900 bags/40’ FCL 25 kg bags (55.115 lbs.): 880 bags/40’FCL Super Sacks-1,400-1,600 lbs. each
In Shell Sizes: Oversize: (55 count per pound or less)
Extra Large: (56-63 count per pound)
Large: (64-77 count per pound)
Medium: (78-95 count per pound)
Small: (96-120 count per pound)
Color Classifications:
Light Kernel is mostly golden in color or lighter; no more than 25% of the surface is darker than golden and none of the surface is darker than light brown
Light Amber More than 25% of the kernel surface is light brown and no more than 25% of the surface is darker than light brown; none of the surface is darker than a medium brown color
Amber More than 25% of the kernel surface is medium brown; no more than 25% of the kernel surface is darker than medium brown; none of the surface is darker than dark brown
Dark Amber More than 25% of the kernel surface is dark brown; no more than 25% of the surface is darker than dark brown 

Kernel Grades:

Fancy
Kernal Size:  

 

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[wptabtitle]SHELLED[/wptabtitle]
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Mammoth Halves

200-250/lb or 440-550/kg
250 or less per pound

Large/Medium Pieces



Thru 26/64″ screen over 19/64′ or thru 10.3 mm screen over 7.5mm
251-300 count per pound

Small/Medium Pieces

Thru 19/64″ screen over 16/64′ or thru 7.5 mm screen over 6.4 mm

Medium Pieces



Thru 22/64″ screen over 16/64′ or thru 8.7 mm screen over 6.4 mm

Jumbo Halves



300-350/lb or 660-770/kg

Extra Large Pieces



Thru 36/64″ screen over 28/64′ or thru 14.3 mm screen over 11.1 mm

Packing
  • 25 lb cartons- 1,000 cs per 20’FCL Vacuum Packed
  • 25 lb cartons- 1,680 cs per 40’FCL Vacuum Packed

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